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Erik Moberg ã:
A Theory of Democratic Politics
 
 

22 - PRESIDENTIAL CONSTITUTIONS WITH PROPORTIONAL ELECTIONS: SUMMARY AND FURTHER CONCLUSIONS

The main characteristic of this constitutional system is that its two main components that is the president or the presidency on one side, and the legislature on the other are likely to be ill-matched.

The politics of the legislature is likely to be party politics to a large extent. This means that party main actors are likely to play dominant roles. It also means that all legislators, in all likelihood, are people making party careers.

Candidates aspiring for the presidency do not, however, necessarily have to belong to a political party. Their careers are not necessarily party careers. Still, of course, an elected president does have a personal mandate of some kind of his or her own.

The important main implication of this incongruous pattern is that clashes between the president and the legislature are likely and, in particular, that main actors in the legislature may try to blackmail the president.